College of Engineering and Computer Science

Artworks below are created by artists from ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science. Inspirations and designs in which artworks below are created are derived from ANU Academics or research project from ANU Academics. 

Artwork title: 'To Mould; A Verb' 

To Mould; A Verb is based on the research of Dr Catherine Galvin of the Australian National University College of Engineering and Computer Science and conversations between Dr Galvin and the artist.

Dr Galvin’s research looks at how age and movement factor in the disease of osteoarthritis of the human knee.

The research is based on data from the first moving image scans collected from moving living bodies rather than cadavers. Through conversation, we discussed the concept of how when we move, we are shaping not only our own bodies but also the bodies of future generations and that of their and our surrounding environments. The ideas of kinematics and care became connected in considering how the manner in which we care for ourselves not only affects our own agency in the world but also all other livings in that world and its future. We have inherited the bodies of our ancestors not only via DNA but also through their actions and the environment through which they once moved and evolved to live within. The work itself is a photograph of captured still images showing the movements of a handmade mechanical working model of a knee that was made and cared for by the artist. The model is designed to demonstrate the kinematics of acts of care, and the agency they can create in the world through movement. The materials that the model is made from have been selected due to their materiality reflecting on the nature of bodies as no longer only existing inside of ecosystems but being ecosystems within themselves.

 

Artist: Sophie Dumaresq

Sophie Dumaresq (b. 1991 Canberra, Australia) is an artist working in new media robotic arts and photo media in addition to large and small scale sculptural installations. Her work explores symbiotic cycles of consumption, destruction and creation demonstrating how as a species we relate, show empathy and evolve with and within our surrounding environment. In 2009 she attended a student internship program at Questacon The Australian National Centre for Science and Technology.

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She completed her Diploma in Photography (honours) at Spéos International photography school - Paris & London and has participated in group exhibitions in Australia, France, Greece and Germany. She is based in Canberra, Australia currently finishing her Bachelor of Visual Arts at The Australian National University’s School of Art and Design’s Sculpture Workshop.

 

 

Dr Catherine Galvin

Dr Catherine Galvin

Dr Catherine Galvin is an Electrical/Electronic Engineer, Sport Scientist and Biomechanist. At the ANU she is a convenor and lecturer of the first and second year electronics courses, as well as the Capstone project - all of which she loves teaching. Dr Galvin’s research encompasses the mechanics of the knee. She has been looking at improving the measurement systems of joint motion, as well as developing a predictive model which can focus on the early diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis using mechanics and special image processing techniques. She is excited by the opportunities where people can work in a multidisciplinary environment with Engineering and Orthopaedics.

 

Artwork title: 'Light Management'

Whilst reading Professor Kylie's research on improving the efficiency of tandem perovskite/silicon photovoltaic cells, the concept and subsequent issue of ‘light management’ resonated with me. Light management is the concept and problem of how to best capture and use as much of the constituent wavelengths of the spectrum of light as possible to produce a power source.

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This is achieved via very technical applications of certain materials and specifically designed material architectures, and results in higher efficiency, cheaper solar cells for proposed use in commercial solar panels. The idea of light management resonated with me because I work with glass and the properties of light and colour, as well as have an accompanying interest in the physics, chemistry, and mathematics of light and it’s properties when interacting with material and surface. My current work utilises data visualisation, more specifically, I am capturing colours of light in the form of numbers which are then processed and built into data-based objects that hold information. Professor Kylie’s work produces a lot of similar data regarding light, and it’s absorption into surfaces, as well as it’s transmission through material, and most importantly, its conversion into electricity. It is my intention that the complexity of her research and the scientific constructs she relies on are brought forth by concept abstraction and data visualisation, so that the true beauty of what her work and research is achieving can be recognised. My digital work ‘Light Management’ utilises 3d modelling techniques in combination with photorealistic rendering to visualise these concepts and data.

 

Artist: Jeremy Maffescioni

Jeremy David Maffescioni (b. 1999) is an Australian conceptual artist, post-digital glass craftsperson, and aspiring polymath. Driven by insatiable curiosity, they investigate the function and behaviour of physical materials and mathematical constructs, as well as the relationships between them.

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They work to comprehend things by seeing, questioning, and making, using these methods to manifest objects they wish to see in existence. In their current investigation of light, colour, and vision, they have created a method of form finding to mathematically describe the experience of seeing existing glass art objects, transformed in a new virtual and material dimensionality. This involves measuring the colour of a piece of glass art using a device that outputs colour data, which is then processed through out-sourced mathematical functions. This data transform is a tool-making process, producing digital curves which are manipulated into forms, compiled into a prescient library of catalogued tools. These tools are to be realised with digital fabrication and will be materialised in glass, serving as tools for the modern expansion of vision.

Kylie Catchpole

Kylie Catchpole

Kylie Catchpole is Professor in the School of Engineering at the Australian National University. She has research interests in solar cells and solar fuels as well as the broader energy transition. She has been awarded several fellowships including a Future Fellowship from the Australian Research Council and she was awarded the inaugural John Booker Medal for Engineering Science from the Australian Academy of Science.

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Recently, her work has focused on ways to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of solar electricity and solar generated hydrogen. She works collaboratively with a talented and diverse team of researchers. Together, they have created world-record efficiency solar cells and solar hydrogen systems using new, low cost approaches [1,2,3]. The main idea behind much of this work is to take advantage of the difference in energy of photons in the different colours of the solar spectrum. Blue photons have more energy, and red photons have less energy. This means that if you stack two solar cells on top of each other in a ‘tandem’ configuration, the top cell will tend to absorb the high energy blue light, and the bottom cell will absorb the lower energy red and infra-red light. As a result the top cell produces more voltage, and the overall efficiency of the tandem is higher than the efficiency of a single cell. The cost can be kept low through the use of a class of materials called ‘perovskites’, which can be very easy and cheap to process when the right chemical elements are incorporated. The tandem cells can also be incorporated into a catalytic system to make solar generated hydrogen. The voltage produced by the tandem is very well matched to the voltage required to split water to generate electricity, meaning that high efficiencies can also be achieved in solar hydrogen generation. 

[1] J. Peng et al., Science, 371 (6527), 390-395 (2021).

[2] T. Duong et al., Advanced Energy Materials 10 (9), 1903553 (2020). 

[3] S. Karuturi et al., Advanced Energy Materials 10 (28), 2000772 (2020).

 

Artwork title: 'Human Touch'

Humanitarian engineer, Dr. Jeremy Smith, aims to reintroduce the human aspect back into the field of engineering. From working with a community to communicating with local partners and other engineers on the team, co-designing appropriate technology plays a crucial role in Smith’s work. Over the summer, I discussed with Dr. Smith about the potential ways to visualise his unique practice that “critiques engineering while improving quality of life for everyone”. Rather than depicting distinct individuals, the two sets of arms highlight the collaborative process that is fundamental to humanitarian engineering.

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The hands on the right hold a mobile phone, a tool that has become increasingly important as a means of documentation for fieldwork, and to ensure direct and ongoing feedback with the local partners and their community, especially during the pandemic. In contrast, the left set of arms hold a physical notebook with various notes on refining the appropriate technology laid out on the table. They include a face shield (PPE), 3D printed foot orthesis, water treatment filters made of clay and coffee grinds, and small-scale household solar systems. Various tools used to create these objects including a 3D printer and microprocessor, Arduino, are also present. The hands in the foreground further indicate that the technology is “secondary” to those involved in the process. Above the table, photographs from fieldwork and images of the teams of engineers are visible, another reminder that the people rather than the technology are the core of a humanitarian project. Smith works with communities on a domestic and international scale. The map of Southeast Asia on the wall presenting countries Smith and his collaborators work in, including Laos, Cambodia, Papua New Guinea, and Australia. The large window on the right revealing a view of the Australian landscape is another essential detail in the background as I was reminded that change starts in our own communities.

 

Chin-Jie Melodie Liu

Chin-Jie Melodie Liu is an emerging Taiwanese artist based in Canberra, Australia. In 2020, Liu completed a Bachelor of Visual Arts with First Class Honours under Printmedia & Drawing at the Australian National University (ANU). Liu was the recipient of the 2020 ANU School of Art & Design Emerging Arts Support Scheme (EASS) Megalo Print Studio & Gallery Residency Award, Country to Coast Residency and Exhibition Award, Gallery of Small Things Exhibition Award, EASS Patrons Honours Scholarship, and the Gray Smith and Joan Scott Prize.

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Through the School of Art & Design exchange program, Liu studied at the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts in Paris, France, and was the recipient of the 2019 Westende Travel Grant. Liu also holds a Bachelor of Arts from ANU with a major in French Culture and Language and a minor in International Relations. Liu is currently pursuing a Master of Museum and Heritage Studies at ANU.

Jeremy Smith

Jeremy Smith

Dr Jeremy Smith has been studying or working at the ANU since his undergraduate engineering studies in the early 1990's which led him to seeing myself as an engineer. Dr Jeremy Smith has been studying or working at the ANU since his undergraduate engineering studies in the early 1990's which led him to seeing myself as an engineer.

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At the ANU, Dr Smith led the creation of the earliest Humanitarian Engineering education courses and programs in Australia. His research builds on close collaborations with community-focused organisations exploring how engineering and technology can be design, developed and utilised to support the aspirations of individual and communities to improve their quality of life.

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