A new era in the history of philanthropy in Australia

12 July 2016

The Tuckwell program helps the entire University by engaging a diverse cross-section of Australian society with the ANU and its mission goes well beyond the scholars themselves.

Hi everyone,

I am delighted to make a very special announcement today.

In 2013, one of our most distinguished graduates, Graham Tuckwell, and his wife Louise created what is now known to be one of the most transformational undergraduate scholarships in Australia, the Tuckwell Scholarship, through an extraordinary act of philanthropy.

Today I am very pleased to tell you that Graham and Louise have expanded the prized Tuckwell Scholarship Program with around $200 million now planned to fund the Program over the next 30 years.

The funding will come from two iconic new halls of residence at ANU to be built over the next two years, funded by Graham and Louise Tuckwell at a cost of around $100 million.

The expansion includes hiring a number of full-time and part-time staff to support the Program and the construction of a $10 million Scholars House building, which will be the pastoral, academic and social heart of the Tuckwell Scholarship program. 

The collegiate-style residences will each house 400 ANU students in the heart of the campus. The new halls will provide students with one of the world's best experiences of living on-campus.

Revenue from the residences will fund the Tuckwell Scholarship Program in perpetuity and will lead to an increase in the number of scholarships offered each year.

The Tuckwell program helps the entire University by engaging a diverse cross-section of Australian society with the ANU and its mission goes well beyond the scholars themselves.

I am very honoured to receive this magnificent contribution from the Tuckwells on behalf of the ANU community. It marks a new milestone in the history of philanthropy to a university in this country, and is a monumental contribution that will be a legacy for many decades to come.

This is a truly outstanding contribution and I hope you will all join me in thanking Graham and Louise for their extraordinary generosity.

With best wishes,
Brian

Comments

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Comment by Rhonda Miles
3.45pm 12 Jul 2016

Our son is a Tuckwell Scholar and the whole experience for him and I am sure the other scholars  has been truly transformational. Investment in education is an investment in our nations future. Thank you seems insufficient for the extent and scale of the Tuckwells genorosity.... anyway.... from the Miles family in Toowoomba Qld a huge thank you for investing in  the Scholars and in ANU's future more generally. 

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Comment by D.C. "Bear" McPhail
3.45pm 12 Jul 2016

Fantastic news! I was at the lunch at ANU where this was announced, and came away inspired by the generosity and vision represented so well in the Tuckwells. I hope this is a big step towards growing philanthropy that will help support the ANU and its students and staff.  I hope, too, that it will grow to help support universities across Australia!

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Comment by John Mackey
4pm 12 Jul 2016

This is wonderful news for the ANU and a big thank you to the Tuckwell Family for their insight and generosity.

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Comment by William John Markwell
4pm 12 Jul 2016

Well done the Tuckwells and thank you from the Australian population.

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Comment by Graham Hicks
4pm 12 Jul 2016

I would like to write something profound or special in regard to this amazing story. It is such a vast contribution, and so selfless that I can say nothing, else I will be subtracting from the magnitude of it!

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Comment by Heidi Yates
4pm 12 Jul 2016

What uplifting and fantastic news! 

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Comment by Elizabeth Boulton
4pm 12 Jul 2016

Remarkable contribution, so lovely to see such foresight and concern for our collective citizenry

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Comment by Peter Agoth
4pm 12 Jul 2016

There has never been a better use for $200m

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Comment by Dr Ian Walker
4.30pm 12 Jul 2016

This is a remarkable gift that further emphasises the links between collegiate residence, citizenship and scholarship. Over the years there have been gifts for educational purposes across all levels of education, many given with little fanfare and recognition, in an Australian context of expectation that the government will provide. There was, in fact, a 'golden era' of government funding for universities and residences in the 1960s and early 70s, that contributed much to the establishment of ANU Halls and Colleges. This gift, however, is in the league of 19th century Victorian philanthropist Francis Ormond, whose funding (among other things) saw the Working Men's College of Melbourne eventually become RMIT University, and the establishment of Ormond College, University of Melbourne. Gifts in the 1950s and 1960s of Sir Adolf Basser (Sydney University's first computer; the Basser Library at the Australian Academy of Science etc.) and Phillip Goldstein resulted in Basser and Goldstein Colleges at UNSW. Of course, the gift of Andrew Forrest to UWA will see the opening of Forrest Hall, affiliated with St George's College, for post-doctoral scholars and researchers. A former Master of Ormond College and former Governor of Victoria, the late Dr Davis McCaughey, noted that residential colleges are "part of the academic enterprise - part of the business of learning"; they are so much more than just places to stay! No doubt there will be continuing discussion and planning about what this contribution will mean in terms of 'college', especially for the Bruce Hall community; and it will certainly inform a broad discussion in November (13-17) at the Collegiate Way International Conference to be held here at University House.