ANU Recovery - FAQs

We have developed the below questions and answers based on queries coming in from the community throughout our Recovery.

This page will be updated frequently. *Last updated on Friday 20 November at 5pm.

Stage 1 of the ANU Recovery commenced in September with the release of the University's financial position, followed by consultation on the University Recovery Plan; and the Financial Health Strategy.

We moved into Stage 2 of the ANU Recovery on Tuesday 13 October with the release of the ANU Recovery Plan; the College and Portfolio Recovery Plans; and the ANU Service Performance Framework.

FAQs have been provided throughout each stage of the Recovery process. Click on the tabs below to find out more.

Stage 2 (current stage)
Frequently asked questions

  » Click here to jump to additional information for staff on redundancy, redeployment and expression of interest (EOI).

2.1 What is stage 2?

Stage 2 of the ANU Recovery Plan commenced on Tuesday 13 October with the release of the ANU Recovery Plan; the College and Portfolio Recovery Plans; and the ANU Service Performance Framework. We welcome feedback through the ANU Recovery website or through College and Portfolio staff forums.

Formal consultation in stage 2 will commence at the time of release of College and Portfolio Change Management Proposals.

2.2 What is the timeline for Stage 2?

The timetable for the commencement of Stage 2 is detailed below:

Tuesday 13 October 2020

  • Release of updated ANU Recovery Plan
  • Release of College and Portfolio Recovery Plans;
  • Release of the ANU Service Performance Framework for consultation; and
  • All staff forums

From 15 October 2020

  • College and Portfolio staff forums; and
  • College and Portfolio change management plans released.

From January 2021:

  • College and Portfolios change management plans released (tranche 2); and
  • Implementation of confirmed changes from College and Portfolio change management plans.

In accordance with timelines outlined in the College and Portfolio Plans, it is expected some detailed Change Management Plans will be released to local areas and the ANU Community during October and November 2020.

For the remaining Colleges and Portfolios, if required, they will release Change Management Plans during January 2021.

2.3 Can I provide feedback on Stage 2?

We always want staff to provide feedback. All staff are encouraged to review the University Recovery Plan documents and provide feedback to your local area, through staff forums or via the ANU Recovery website. 

2.4 Will there be staff forums during Stage 2?

Yes. There was an all staff Town Hall on 13 October. You can view the recording here and the PowerPoint slides are available here.

From 14 October, there will also be staff forums for Colleges and Portfolios. A list of local area forums will be published on our website, and staff invited by their College Dean or Portfolio head.

2.5 What happens after the release of College and Portfolio Plans?

Following the release of the updated ANU Recovery Plan and associated documents and all staff forum, Colleges and Portfolios will commence forums and updates within their local areas. In accordance with timelines outlined in the College and Portfolio Plans, it is expected some detailed Change Management Plans will be released to local areas and the ANU Community during October and November 2020.

For the remaining Colleges and Portfolios, if required, they will release Change Management Plans during January 2021.

2.6 When will I know what the impact is for my local area?

College and Portfolio Recovery Plans will be released on 13 October. These will be published on the ANU Recovery website. The plans outline the process for each College and Portfolio to consider and manage any changes that may be required to respond to and support the ANU Recovery Plan and the Expenditure Control Framework (ECF).

As part of Stage 2, your local area will consult with you on any formal Change Management Proposals. Each area will release timelines for their staff. Please speak with your supervisor, Director, General Manager or Dean if you have any questions.

2.7 How much feedback did ANU receive during Stage 1 of the consultation? Did you do anything with it?

During the Stage 1 consultation period, we received extensive feedback and questions through the ANU Recovery website, email and forums. At the close of the consultation period on 29 September 2020, we had received 143 pieces of individual feedback which included 181 suggestions and 924 questions.  We addressed 915 questions raised during the forums or sent via the ANU Recovery website and direct email.  Some questions have been answered live during the forums and those that were unable to be answered in the forums have been provided directly back to the respondent following the forums (where a name was attached to the question).   

You can read the Consultation Outcomes and Response document here (under 'reference documents').

The Consultation Outcomes and Response document addressed feedback in three ways:

  • Ideas and suggestions to be considered by the University and the relevant College and Portfolio as part of the Recovery Plans. 
  • Ideas and suggestions that are currently offered and supported by the University.
  • Ideas and suggestions that are unable to be supported.

2.8 What information is included in the Consultation Outcomes and Response paper?
The Consultation Outcomes and Response document includes a summary of all feedback grouped around key themes and the ANU response to the suggestions put forward by the ANU community. The paper also includes a detailed table providing the number of pieces of feedback received on different topics.

2.9 How will the 2020 Federal Budget impact on the ANU Recovery Plan?

The Federal Budget is a welcome injection of short-term cash into the University that will mean more of our researchers can keep doing their important work and we can save some jobs. However, we will still need to make difficult decisions about reshaping ANU for the future and we are still in for a tough time and we will need to cut some jobs due to falling revenue and COVID-19.

2.10 Are voluntary separations still available? If so, who do I speak to?

If you are interested in a voluntary separation, please speak to your manager. You can also speak with your General Manager, Service Division Director, Research School Director or School Manager.

2.11 What support is available to me?

The University's highest priority is the health, wellbeing and safety of our community. We aim to provide our community with support so we can help each other get through this challenging time.

Staff and their family members can access free support and counselling through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which can be reached on 1800 808 374 (this number operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week). 

Staff can also contact the ANU Advisers to Staff who provide free, confidential and professional counselling and advice to staff on-campus in dealing with work-related or personal issues that may be affecting their work. 

These services are available to us all and can help provide you with advice about the things that you can do to help support you during times of change. A full list of our support services is available here.

2.12 What is the difference between the ANU Recovery Plan document published on 16 September, and the ANU Recovery Plan published on 13 October?

The document published on 16 September was an Initial Change Consultation document, which outlined the challenges we face and how we must adapt to our new circumstances in order to thrive in the future. This document also provided specific details on how any proposed changes within local areas would be available for consultation and feedback, and the principles which will support any confirmed changes that may need to be implemented

The ANU Recovery Plan published on 13 October is a detailed document that outlines the ANU Recovery Plan from 2020-2023, the anticipated timeframe for the University to recover its financial health. This document considers feedback from the Community, and individual College and Portfolio Recovery Plans.

2.13 When will the individual College/Portfolio Change Management proposals be released?

This varies across the College and Portfolios, and the timeline for preparing for and managing changes is outlined within each individual Recovery Plan. 

For some, the details of proposed changes may need to be released for consultation as soon as possible, and Change Management Plans will be released during October and November 2020.

For others, the details of any proposed changes may not be finalised until 2021 and the Change Management Plans will be released for consultation during January 2021.

2.14 What is the ANU Service Performance Framework?

The ANU Service Performance Framework is a whole-of-University resource that provides a standard process to follow when reviewing services to identify the need, define the problem and plan the way forward. Most importantly it is underpinned by Service Experience, Service Capability and Service Design Principles which will guide any change in service delivery.

It will help the University deliver a sustainable operating model which is coherent and unified, and which enables a world-class environment for students, academics, professional staff and partners in service experience, delivery and design.

The framework has been developed by the Service Provision Working Group, an academically-led working group, which has extensively consulted on the frameworks design with stakeholders from across the University.

The Framework will ensure our services are collaborative, responsive, continuously improving, value for money and provide exceptional service. 

2.15 How did the Executive determine which areas of the University will receive investment, while others are reducing their budgets?

Each College and Portfolio will be given an allocation in 2021 that reflects its individual circumstances. One of the most important considerations is how we raise new revenue, and how we protect our major revenue streams.

An important part of the ANU Recovery Plan and Financial Health Strategy is the investment that needs to be made in areas and activities that are strategic priorities. These include:

  1. Business development and commercialisation of research
  2. Philanthropy and fund raising
  3. New modes of teaching such as micro-credentials
  4. Continued improvements to the student experience
  5. The creation of a new First Nations portfolio
  6. Excellence and emerging academic areas.

The University must work to diversify funding sources and collaborations.  It needs to invest to generate revenue and reconsider spending in other areas.  This means slowing but maintaining momentum for some projects, pausing projects where we can pick them back up later, and sadly ceasing some activities entirely.

2.16 Will all areas of the University make staff redundant?

Salary savings need to be achieved across the University.  How this is achieved will depend on the savings required and the strategic needs in each College and Portfolio. These savings may require a reduction in the number of positions in some areas but not in others where savings may be able to be achieved in other ways.

Where salary savings are required, where possible, they will be achieved through voluntary separations, natural attrition, salary savings from reductions to part time work, and not backfilling extended periods of leave.

2.17 My College/Portfolio Recovery Plan states that there will be a reduction of positions. When will my area receive our Change Management Proposal?

The savings required through a reduction of positions may be achieved through voluntary separations, natural attrition, salary savings from staff changing to part time work, and not backfilling extended periods of leave and as such, a formal Change Management Proposal may not be required.

For those that require a Change Management Proposal, timeframes are outlined within the College or Portfolio Recovery Plan.

2.18 How many people have taken voluntary separations?

As at 9 October 2020, 273 staff have agreed to a voluntary separation. We are continuing to discuss options with staff and we expect further staff may accept voluntary separations.

2.19 The 2020 Federal Budget announced a cash-boost for research. Why do we still need to reduce our staffing profile?

The Federal Budget released on 6 October, provides additional one-off funding for the Research Support Program (RSP). The RSP does not represent an ongoing fundamental change to our financial position - our 2021 revenue projections remain otherwise unchanged and we will still need to pursue savings across our salary expenses.

The DVC Research and Innovation and the Colleges are working through the application of this funding, and in particular are focussing on ensuring the appropriate allocation of the funding to support the contingent research workforce and research infrastructure.

2.20 What is the proportion of budget allocation between College and Portfolios?

The allocation between Colleges and Portfolios is similar in 2021 at 64 per cent allocated to Colleges and 36 per cent Portfolios.

2.21 Will some positions be recruited for the future? What are the criteria for these roles?

Some positions will need to be recruited to build capability and maintain critical service levels and each will be assessed on a case by case basis.

2.22 The Consultation Outcomes and Feedback Paper indicates that ANU management will investigate two potential saving measures - an extended end of year shutdown and removing the annual leave loading paid in January each year. Why are we releasing local area plans if we might still save money through these measures?

These two proposed costs saving measures are being investigated and may save some jobs, however prior to them being able to be implemented, both measures would require the support of staff through a vote to amend the ANU Enterprise Agreement, and also require the support of the NTEU.  There remains an overall need for change and it is important for the information about the impact on each College and Portfolio are provided through local area plans.

2.23 I had suggestions and feedback about efficiencies - how are you incorporating this feedback?

All feedback has been received and recorded and included in the Consultation Outcomes and Response paper. All new feedback received is welcomed, and will be assessed as it is received.

2.24 Will the University Executive be reduced in size?

Yes.

The Vice-Chancellor is aware of the need to seek savings in every part of the University including our leadership team. This is why the Vice-Chancellor and the Senior Management Group accepted a pay cut in the second half of 2020.

The overall structure of the University Executive will undergo a redesign to lead the development and implementation of the ANU Recovery Plan and our next strategic plan (ANU 2022-2025).

This will mean four Executive roles are being disestablished, two of which - Provost and Pro Vice-Chancellor (University Experience) - are currently unfilled. In addition, two current members of the executive have decided to step down from the Executive and will finish their roles in December 2020. These are the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Innovation) and the Vice-President (Engagement and Global Relations).

2.25 I have a question that isn't listed on the FAQ page. Who can I contact?

Please email anurecovery@anu.edu.au; or you can submit a form via the ANU Recovery Plan website.

2.26 Will the amount of SSAF funding available be Impacted by ANU Recovery Strategy? 

The Student Services & Amenities Fee (SSAF) is collected from students to support the delivery of a range of non-academic services. We are required to spend this money in line with legislation, including consultation and transparency around how it is spent. 

Unfortunately lower student numbers translates into a smaller amount of SSAF money collected. 

Traditionally, ANU has supplemented SSAF funding with additional University funds to support the work of SSAF service providers. 

Professor Ian Anderson, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Student and University Experience), has been consulting with all service providers who receive SSAF funding across campus on the process for allocating SSAF and will continue to do so as student numbers and the University's budget is finalised. 

2.27 Will the number and value of HDR scholarships available for awarding in 2021 be impacted by the ANU Recovery Plan? 

Funding for HDR scholarships comes from a range of sources. 

We expect to receive funding from the Australian Government for Research Training Program (RTP) scholarships in 2021 at a similar value to 2020. However, our past allocations mean we have commitments to a large number of candidates. This will result in fewer new RTP scholarships being available for allocation in 2021. 

The University and Colleges have historically provided additional funding to support HDR scholarships including University Research Scholarships (URS). While all parts of the University are prioritising student experience and recognise the important role HDR candidates have in the University, it is too early to determine the full impact but there is likely to be less funding available.  

We also have scholarships paid through philanthropic giving and money received from donors will continue to be spent as per our commitments.  

Some candidates at the University benefit from scholarships sponsored by Industry. It is too early to tell whether wider economic conditions will impact levels of industry sponsorship, but ANU, through the Recovery Plan, is prioritising business development and this will provide opportunities for new relationships with business. 

Many of our HDR candidates receive scholarship funding from International partners and governments. We do not yet know if the volume of these scholarships available will be impacted by COVID-19 but we are monitoring this closely and continuing to prioritise key partnerships and relationships. 

Over the coming months, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation) and the Dean HDR, will work together with Colleges to work through the availability of scholarship funds over and above government funding in 2021. 

2.28 Will the ANU Recovery Plan result in reductions of scholarship stipends, if the conditions of award allow changes in the stipend value? 

No. All current HDR scholarships will be paid and the conditions of award will not change as a result of the ANU Recovery Plan. Stipends will continue to be paid as outlined in each ANU Scholarship Offer. 

2.29 Will the stipends my School / College provide on top of Government RTP scholarships be affected by the ANU Recovery Plan? 

All current HDR scholarships will be paid and the conditions of award will not change as a result of the ANU Recovery Plan. 

We have made information available to Higher Degree Research candidates on the support available for candidates impacted by COVID on our dedicated HDR candidate support page.  

It is too early to determine the full impact on the volume of funds available as stipends to new scholarship recipients from 2021.  

Over the coming months the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation) and the Dean HDR will work together with Colleges to work through the availability of scholarship funds over and above government funding in 2021. 

2.30 Will Domestic Coursework Student Fees increase in 2021 due to the ANU Recovery Plan? 

No fee changes are related to the ANU Recovery Plan.  

Undergraduate Domestic Students and Postgraduate Students with a Commonwealth Supported Place (CSP) 

On 19 October 2020 the Australian Parliament passed legislation which changed the contributions students pay for their higher education effective 1 January 2021. 

More information on the changes can be found here. 

Under this system, you are charged a rate based on the discipline and volume of study. You can continue to defer payment of your contribution through a HECS-HELP loan from the Government. The government has also introduced a 10 per cent discount for students who pay $500 or more of their student contribution upfront (not deferred). 

ANU will continue to charge students the maximum student contribution amount for which they are eligible, consistent with previous years. These changes are unrelated to the ANU Recovery Plan. 

If you are already enrolled before 1 January 2021, and you meet the Government's eligibility criteria, you'll continue to pay the same fees as if the legislation had not been passed. 

You can see the current and new rates here. 

Postgraduate Domestic Coursework Fee-Paying Students 

We have approved a small increase in domestic postgraduate fees, at an indexation rate of 1.8%. This increase is substantially less than previous increases and is designed to cover increases in the cost of delivery.  

This was approved before the ANU Recovery Plan was launched and is unrelated to the initiatives in the plan. 

You are reminded that costs vary depending on your choice of subject. More information on postgraduate domestic fees can be found here

Students who have financial concerns should refer to the University's COVID Financial Support pages

Students are also encouraged to apply for any scholarships for which they might be eligible more detail can be found here.  

2.31 Will International Student Fees increase in 2021? 

We have approved a small increase in international fees, at an indexation rate of 1.8%. This increase is substantially less than previous rises and is designed to cover rises in the cost of delivery.  

This was approved before the ANU Recovery Plan was launched and is unrelated to the initiatives in the plan. 

You are reminded that costs vary depending on the choice of your subject. More information on international fees can be found here.  

If you have financial concerns, please refer to our COVID Financial Support pages. We also encourage you to apply for any scholarships for which you may be eligible for. More information can be found here.

 

Additional information for staff on redundancy, redeployment and expression of interest (EOI)

The following FAQs have been established to assist staff whose positions are affected by College and Portfolio Change Management Processes. 

My College/Portfolio Recovery Plan states that there will be a reduction of positions. When will my area receive our Change Management Proposal?

The savings required through a reduction of positions may be achieved through voluntary separations, natural attrition, salary savings from staff changing to part time work, and not backfilling extended periods of leave and as such, a formal Change Management Proposal may not be required.

For those that require a Change Management Proposal, timeframes are outlined within the College or Portfolio Recovery Plan. These documents can be accessed here.  

Will all areas of the University make staff redundant?

Salary savings need to be achieved across the University.  How this is achieved will depend on the savings required and the strategic needs in each College and Portfolio. These savings may require a reduction in the number of positions in some areas but not in others, where savings may be able to be achieved in other ways.

If salary savings are required, where possible, they will firstly be achieved through voluntary separations, natural attrition, reductions from full time to part time work, and not backfilling extended periods of leave.

The College and Portfolio Recovery Plans provide an understanding of the financial situation for each area and where savings may be required. These documents can be accessed here.  

What is a redundancy?

The University may determine that a position is no longer required for reasons of an economic, structural or similar nature, including:

  • financial imperative and/or staffing constraints;
  • a decision to vary the academic content in any academic program or course, including to reduce, cease offering or combining courses or subjects conducted on one or more campuses;
  • reduced demand, student load or other workload factors; or
  • changes in technology or work methods.

After a change management proposal and implementation plan has been released, a staff member whose position is identified as redundant will be advised in writing by the HR Division and this notification will usually signal the commencement of a 12 week redeployment period in which the staff member may be redeployed, or the staff member can seek approval for an early separation.

Redundancies only apply to staff with continuing positions with the University.

The following termination of employment payments will apply to staff whose positions are made redundant and who are not redeployed into an alternate role following a 12 week period of redeployment and the relevant notice period:

  • For academic staff: a redundancy payment of three weeks' salary for each year of service with a minimum payment of five weeks' pay and maximum of 68 weeks' pay; and
  • in recognition of the longer lead time for academic recruitment and engagement, an Academic Employment Transition Payment of up to 16 weeks' salary for academic staff, provided that the total of the redundancy payment for academic staff does not exceed 78 weeks (excluding accrued annual and long service leave).
  • For professional staff: a redundancy payment of three weeks' salary for each year of service with a minimum payment of five weeks' pay and maximum of 64 weeks' pay.
  • All staff: payment of accrued annual leave and long service leave.

What options are available to me if my position is declared redundant?

For staff whose positions have been declared redundant, a redeployment process will be initiated which aims to assist staff in being redeployed into a suitable alternate position at the University during a 12) week redeployment period. During this 12 week period, staff will need to apply for positions and go through merit based selection processes. If at the end of the 12 weeks the staff member has not been redeployed into a suitable alternate position, the staff member will be provided with relevant notice that employment with the University will cease, and the staff member will receive a redundancy payment at the end of the notice period.

If staff do not wish to be redeployed into an alternate position, they may seek approval for an early separation at any time during the 12 week redeployment period or notice period.

While the redeployment process focuses on permanently transferring a staff member at the same classification level, staff are welcome to apply for any advertised vacancies across the University at any time during the redeployment process.

What is redeployment?
Redeployment is a process of permanently transferring a staff member whose position has been made redundant into a suitable, at level, alternative position.

If a staff member's position has been declared redundant, they have the opportunity to participate in redeployment and are placed onto a redeployment list for a period of 12 weeks.

During this 12 week period, staff who are on the redeployment list, will be provided with access to any approved vacancies, at level, within the University. Staff will receive notification of relevant positions via email. Once staff receive a notification of a suitable vacant position, they are asked to indicate if they are interested in being considered for the position within two working days. If a staff member indicates that they are interested in a suitable vacant position, they will be invited to submit an application for the position, similar to a standard recruitment process.  It is noted that there may be multiple staff members interested in the same position and a merit based recruitment process will be applied to finalise an outcome.  

How does the redeployment process work?
The redeployment process seeks to avoid staff having to separate from the University and provides an opportunity for staff to be permanently transferred into a suitable alternate role.

Staff whose positions have been declared redundant will be placed onto a redeployment list and provided with access to relevant advertised positions.  Staff who are joining the redeployment list will be asked to submit a current resume to assist with assessment of suitable positions.

Staff on the redeployment list will receive notification of vacant permanent positions and are requested to indicate within two working days of being notified if they are interested in being considered for the role. If they indicate an interest, staff are asked to submit an application for the role. This application may include a resume, a submission addressing the nominated selection criteria and/or a statement about how the staff member's skills, abilities and experience meet the job requirement. Staff may also be asked to attend a panel interview as part of the selection process.

How long is the redeployment period?
The redeployment period is for a 12 week period, in accordance with the ANU Enterprise Agreement.

Staff whose positions have been declared redundant will receive formal notification that their position is redundant and formal notification as to when the redeployment period commences (and ends).

Do I have to work through the redeployment period?

It is expected that staff whose position has been declared redundant will work through the redeployment period and participate in the redeployment process with the aim of permanently transferring them to a suitable alternative role.

At any time during the 12 week redeployment period, a staff member may request an early separation and if this request is approved, the balance of the unworked redeployment period (and notice period) will be paid out in lieu as part of the redundancy package.

What work do I undertake during the redeployment period?

During the 12 week redeployment period, staff usually undertake their usual duties, in their usual position. Given the disruption that COVID-19 has had to University operations, staff may be required to undertake alternative duties as the University works through the current challenges and implements a number of adjustments to our standard operations, including the coordination of voluntary separations and a number of formal change management processes across the University. For staff who are working through the redeployment period, it is helpful during this time that staff are provided with time to attend interviews (when required) and this time should be agreed upon and is subject to approval by  the staff member's current supervisor.

What is 'suitable alternative employment'?
Suitable alternative employment is a position at ANU which has substantially the same duties, classification level and career standing as the redundant position and for which the staff member currently possesses the skills and experience (or could reasonably be expected to develop the required skills within a limited time frame) to satisfactorily perform the duties of the alternate position. A suitable alternate position would also have the same time fraction (hours) although it is acknowledged that full time staff may wish to accept a part time position and part time staff may wish to be considered for full time positions.

Can I say no to a redeployment opportunity?

The aim of the redeployment process is to permanently transfer a staff member into an alternative permanent position. Staff are provided with the opportunity to indicate an interest in being considered for relevant vacant positions at the same classification and it is expected that staff will engage in the process and accept being transferred into relevant positions. If a staff member is not interested in being redeployed then they may request an early separation and if this request is approved, the balance of the unworked redeployment period (and notice period) will be paid out in lieu as part of the redundancy package.

What is an Expression of Interest process?
When implementing a confirmed new structure through a change management process, there may be instances where is it identified that the University cannot automatically directly transfer a staff member's substantive position to the new structure.

Where a position is not able to be directly transferred and there are more at level staff in substantially similar roles than there are positions, then an Expression of Interest (EOI) will be run for those affected staff to fill the available positions.

If an EOI process is required, affected staff will be provided the opportunity to lodge applications for the specific positions which have substantially the same duties, classification level and career standing within the new structure. A selection process will be undertaken based on the standard recruitment process of assessing applicants against the selection criteria for the role. This selection process will include a formal selection panel and interviews may be held for short listed candidates.

An EOI process will commence during the implementation of any confirmed changes and will be open for a minimum of five business days.

An EOI submission would normally include:

  • 1-2 page statement (maximum) written submission which outlines the candidate's strengths against the position description, broadly addressing the selection criteria and requirements for the role, information on demonstrated ability, achievements and experience, and what the staff member brings to the team and the broader ANU, along with anything else the staff member may wish to include.
  • Current curriculum vitae (CV) which includes the names and contact details of at least two referees. 

What if I am unsuccessful or choose not to submit an Expression of Interest?

If a staff member elects to not participate in an EOI process or is not successful in obtaining a position via an EOI process, this results in the staff member being unable to be transferred to the new structure.  In this instance, the staff member would be formally advised in writing by the University that their position has been identified as redundant, and the University will work through the available options with the staff member, in accordance with the redundancy provisions of the Enterprise Agreement.

I am acting in a higher level position, can I participate in an EOI at a higher level?

A direct transfer can only occur to an at-level position.

The direct transfer of a position, and the incumbent staff member, will occur where the substantive position is the same classification level, has similar career standing, and the duties are essentially the same or substantially the same as the position within the new structure.

A staff member may apply at any time for any other positions (at any level) available through internal (ANU wide) recruitment processes. 

If I apply for an EOI, can I apply for other positions being advertised across the ANU?

A staff member may apply at any time for any positions available through internal (ANU wide) recruitment processes. These may be positions at the same as their current level, at a higher level or at a lower level.

I'm on parental leave - what happens if my position is made redundant while I am on leave?

All staff will continue to receive information regarding any proposed changes to their local area and position, regardless of whether they are on extended leave (or not).  If any staff that are currently on extended leave and their position is made redundant, they will be formally notified in writing and provided with all relevant information.  The University will work with staff directly in regard to options, which include offering redeployment opportunities, working around leave dates or responding to any requests from staff for an early separation.

I'm currently on a temporary transfer - what happens if my substantive position or my temp transfer position is made redundant?

Staff will be kept informed on formal change proposals for both their substantive local area or their temporary transfer local area.

If a staff member's substantive continuing position is made redundant, they will be formally notified and the University will work with the staff member in regard to redeployment opportunities and other options.  Dependant on the end date of the temporary transfer, this date may have to be reviewed and adjusted if a staff member is successful in being permanently redeployed into a suitable alternate role during the formal redeployment process and the University will work with both local areas to finalise an outcome. If a staff member is not successful in being redeployed into a suitable alternate role during the formal redeployment timeframe, the staff member will be provided with formal notice that their employment with the University will terminate at the end of notice period and the staff member will receive a redundancy package.  If this date is prior to the expiration of the temporary transfer, the temporary transfer will expire early.

If the temporary transfer position is made redundant, the University will work with staff in regard to options. Dependant on the end date of the temporary transfer, there may be an opportunity to return to the staff member's substantive position early, however this is not guaranteed, especially if the substantive position has been backfilled. Alternate temporary transfer opportunities can be explored until such time that the staff member can return to their substantive role, however a vacancy would need to exist for this to be facilitated. Staff on temporary transfers may be given opportunities to express an interest in positions within their temporary transfer area, however priority will be given to staff with ongoing roles whose positions have been made redundant. Employment with the University will continue, as only staff in continuing positions that are declared redundant are subject to redundancy provisions.

Can I be redeployed into a lower classified position?
The redeployment process aims to permanently transfer staff into an alternative role at the same level. Where the University cannot identify a suitable alternative position, the staff member may elect to seek redeployment to other positions, including positions at a lower classification. If a staff member is successful in obtaining a position by demonstrating that they meet the selection criteria and agree to being transferred into the role, the staff member may be redeployed into a lower classified position.

Where a staff member agrees to be redeployed to a position with a lower classification, salary maintenance of up to 26 weeks for professional staff and up to 12 months for academic staff may be paid at the pre-transfer salary rate.

Can I be redeployed into a higher classified position?

The redeployment process aims to permanently transfer staff into an alternative role at the same level of their substantive position. If staff wish to be considered for higher classified positions, they are welcome to apply for these positions when advertised and they will be considered for the position with other applicants.  

Can I be redeployed into a fixed term role?

The aim of the redeployment process is to permanently transfer a staff member into a permanent role.  Fixed term roles are not offered as part of the redeployment process, however staff are welcome to apply for any fixed term vacancies - it is noted that by accepting a fixed term position, a staff member who is on the redeployment list is forgoing any relevant redundancy payments. 

What happens if I am not redeployed into a suitable alternate position?

If after the 12 week period, a staff member has not been successfully transferred into a suitable alternate role, formal notification will be provided and a relevant notice period will commence. The staff member will work through this notice period and then separate from the University with a redundancy package, as per the ANU Enterprise Agreement entitlements. 

What if I do not want to be redeployed into an alternate position?

At any time during the 12 week redeployment period or the relevant notice period, a staff member can request an early enhanced separation from the University. If this request is approved, the staff member will separate from the University on an agreed date and the balance of any unworked redeployment and/or notice period will be paid in lieu to the staff member, in accordance with the ANU Enterprise Agreement. 

If I am offered a redundancy, what date do I need to leave?

Any staff whose positions are declared redundant will receive formal notification in writing which will outline the redundancy process and timeline.Once a position is declared redundant, a staff member will commence a 12 week

redeployment period which is a process of redeploying staff into suitable, at level, alternate roles within the University. If redeployment into an alternate role is not finalised during this 12 week period, the staff member will work through a notice period of at least six weeks and then separate from the University with a redundancy payment.  

If a staff member requests an early separation at any time during the redeployment or notice period, a departure date will be mutually agreed and is subject to approval by the Director, Human Resources. 

What happens at the end of the redeployment period? 

If a staff member has not been successful in obtaining an alternate position during the 12 week redeployment period, the relevant notice period will commence at the end of the redeployment process. A staff member will work through the notice period and then separate from the University with a redundancy payment. 

What is the notice period and how long is it?

The notice period commences at the end of the redeployment period.  The notice period is six weeks.  In addition, where a staff member is over 45 years of age and they have completed two or more years of continuous service with the University, an additional one week notice will be provided. 

Do I have to work through the notice period?

It is expected staff whose position has been declared redundant will work through the redeployment period and notice period.

At any time during the notice period, a staff member may request an early separation and, if approved, the balance of the unworked notice period will be paid out in lieu as part of the redundancy package. 

Are voluntary separations still available? If so, who do I speak to?

If you are interested in a voluntary separation, please speak to your manager. You can also speak with your Portfolio Head, Dean, General Manager, Service Division Director, Research School Director or School Manager.

Any enquiries regarding voluntary separations can be directed to HRD.Staff.Funding@anu.edu.au.

Can I decide to take a voluntary separation during the redeployment period?

Once a position has formally been made redundant and a staff member has commenced the formal redeployment period, the staff member may request an early separation and, if approved, the balance of the redeployment and notice period will be paid out in lieu as part of the redundancy package. 

What is the difference between an involuntary redundancy and a voluntary separation?

A voluntary separation is a negotiated departure from ANU, mutually agreed between the University and the departing staff member, negotiating the date of departure and the terms and conditions of separation. Under the current voluntary separation arrangements, we are matching the redundancy provisions under the ANU Enterprise Agreement. A staff member who accepts a voluntary separation would receive payment in lieu of not working through the redeployment and notice periods. A voluntary separation also has flexibility in regard to a departure date, whereas an involuntary redundancy has set dates and timeframes.

An involuntary redundancy is one of the potential outcomes resulting from a change management process. Under a change management proposal the University may propose the dis-establishment of a position. Following consultation, the University is required as part of the ANU Enterprise Agreement, to work through job security options, and if unable to action any of those options, it may be necessary to disestablish the position and make the position redundant. If this occurs, the redundancy provisions will be implemented. The redundancy provisions are found in Clause 56 of the ANU Enterprise Agreement and require the University to consider redeployment options. If a staff member is unable to be redeployed, then notice will be provided and a redundancy payment will be made.

What will I receive in my termination payment if I am made redundant? 

The following termination payments will apply to staff whose positions are made redundant and who are not directly transferred or redeployed into an alternate role and who have worked through the redeployment and notice periods:

  • For academic staff: a redundancy payment of three weeks' salary for each year of service with a minimum payment of five weeks' pay and maximum of 68 weeks' pay; and
  • in recognition of the longer lead time for academic recruitment and engagement, an Academic Employment Transition Payment of up to 16 weeks' salary for academic staff, provided that the total of the redundancy payment for academic staff does not exceed 78 week (excluding accrued annual and long service leave).
  • For professional staff: a redundancy payment of three weeks' salary for each year of service with a minimum payment of five weeks' pay and maximum of 64 weeks' pay.
  • All staff: payment of accrued annual leave and long service leave.

If staff request an early separation at any time during the redeployment or notice period, the unworked portions of the redeployment and notice period will be paid out in lieu in addition to the above payments.  

Will I receive annual leave and long service leave as part of the redundancy payment?

Yes, all staff receive a lump sum payment of their annual leave and, if they have completed at least 12 months service, long service leave entitlements.  Staff also receive a pro-rata payment for annual leave loading based on service.  

Will I be paid superannuation on my redundancy payment?

Any unused portion of the notice period is eligible for superannuation.  All other redundancy payments, including annual leave and long service leave lump sum payments, are not eligible for superannuation.  
Can I return to work for the University after being made redundant or taking a voluntary separation? 

Staff who separate from the University under a voluntary separation or redundancy cannot enter into an employment agreement or contract of service with the University for a period of two years after the departure date.  

What support is available to me?

The University's highest priority is the health, wellbeing and safety of our community. We aim to provide our community with support so we can help each other get through this challenging time.

Staff and their family members can access free support and counselling through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which can be reached on 1800 808 374 (this number operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week). 

Staff can also contact the ANU Advisers to Staff who provide free, confidential and professional counselling and advice to staff on-campus in dealing with work-related or personal issues that may be affecting their work. 

These services are available to all staff and can assist and provide advice about things that may help support you during times of change. A full list of our support services is available here.

I have a question that isn't listed on the FAQ page. Who can I contact?

Any enquiries should be directed to the Organisational Change Team.  Please email org.change@anu.edu.au 

 

Stage 1 FAQs

Financial position

1.  Why do we have to save more money?

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on how our university operates and our finances.

It is now clear that we will face ongoing revenue challenges in 2021 and beyond. Now more than ever, it is imperative we ensure ANU is able to fulfil its distinct national mission. We must adapt to these challenging circumstances so we can thrive in the future.

With that in mind, we are developing an ANU Recovery Plan. This plan will steer us out of the current crisis and ensure the University's long-term stability. 

Financial projections for the three years from 2021 to 2023 shows that our revenue is not likely to grow substantially above the level achieved in 2020.  In order to place ANU on a more sustainable expenditure footing and to accommodate projected lower levels of revenue, an ongoing expenditure reduction of approximately $103.5 million per annum is required in 2021.

This is in addition to the $13.5 million saved by the pay rise deferral - all money saved from the deferral has gone directly back into keeping 90 positions at ANU.  The savings made in 2020 are an important contribution to our financial sustainability, with the voluntary separations and other savings measures resulting in savings of $70.5 million in 2020. 

However, even with those savings factored in, our current spending profile remains structurally misaligned with our revenue projections.

We must adapt to our new financial circumstances in 2021 to remain financially sustainable and avoid placing an unnecessary cost and debt burden on the University's future.  In order to do this, we are using the following three levers in our Financial Health Strategy:   

  • Aiming for Operating Cash Balance
  • Investing in minimal and necessary capital expenditure
  • Adopting a prudent increase in debt (or alternatives) to ensure liquidity.

2.  Can we meet the structural deficit without reducing staff numbers?

We are committed to achieving as much of the required savings as possible from non-salary costs and are continuing to take steps to drive down our non-salary costs and staff have already provided many useful suggestions that are being explored and implemented.

However, while there is still much we can do to improve our procurement and reduce non-salary expenditure, a significant proportion of our non-salary expenditure is devoted to operating our digital and physical infrastructure and these measures will not be enough to meet the overall savings target for 2021.  50% of the savings need to be achieved by reducing our staffing profile.

The suggestions which have been received and are already being explored include:

  • Limiting use of consultants and contractors;
  • Limiting travel (when this resumes) by maintaining alternative modes of collaboration;
  • Investing in Greenhouse Gas emission reductions;
  • Improved procurement of goods and services
  • Reducing non-salary costs such as printing and associated costs through moving to follow me printing and use of online documentation;
  • Negotiating better rates for airline and travel (when business travel recommences); and
  • Flexible working arrangements leading to reduced space footprint.

We know there will be further ideas across the ANU community which may provide opportunities for further savings on non-salary expenses.  If you have further suggestions about how we could reduce our non-salary expenses, please share your ideas in this consultation process.

Feedback may be submitted at anu.edu.au/recovery or anurecovery@anu.edu.au.

3.  Couldn't we just borrow more money?

Yes, the proposed strategy does include taking on more debt.

Whilst we have drawn on our cash reserves and debt capacity in 2020 to fund our voluntary separations and part of our capital works program, we are limited in the amount of debt we can take on with the aggregate debt limit set by the Minister for Finance at $800 million. 

Currently, we have in place $615m of debt capacity, of which we have drawn down $315m.  The use of debt needs to be carefully managed to ensure that we have the funds available to repay the principal debt and the interest in the future.

Our Financial Health Strategy for the next three years results in a net deficit each year and thus our ability to repay debt is reduced.

4.  Isn't this a revenue problem - why are we reducing expenditure?

Yes and no.

We certainly can do more to improve and diversify our revenue streams. However, our expenditure has been increasing at a rate greater than our revenue over the last couple of years, mostly to address areas of underinvestment in the past. There are no realistic accessible revenue sources that we believe will allow us to maintain our current expenditure rates.

5.  What if we have less revenue than predicted next year?

We have modelled multiple revenue scenarios for 2021 and we have adopted the most likely scenario for our planning. The area that poses the largest risk on revenue is the international student cohort.

We are continuing to mitigate the risk by focusing on the retention and support of our current students, working with our agents, sponsoring organisations and partners to continue to diversify our markets.  We are also optimising the use of our scholarships and ensuring students unable to make it onto campus are able to commence and engage with their learning community and peers from their current locations.

6.  Have the savings required been independently verified?

Yes. The University has engaged Mr Steve Somogyi, previously the Chief Operating Officer at RMIT University, to independently review our financial model and the underpinning assumptions. 

Mr Somogyi endorsed the strategy and its underlying methodology, while making small suggestions for improvement, which the University has and will continue to incorporate.

A summary of his findings is available here.

7.  What cost-saving initiatives has the University implemented following the Vice-Chancellor Forums?

There were many suggestions about where we can reduce non-salary expenditure. We continue to investigate all of these to improve buying power and value for money.

For example, funds have been allocated in the strategy to investigate and implement greenhouse gas reductions - consultation is underway through the Below Zero program.

Some immediate measures have included moving meetings to video conferencing (saving travel expenses for board members, catering etc) accessing all papers electronically and using DocuSign to avoid paper-based approvals.

Many areas are also planning ways to maintain their collaborations and networks without returning to the same frequency of travel as occurred before COVID-19.

8.  What other options have been pursued to reduce non-salary expenditure?

We are committed to achieving as much of the required savings as possible through non-salary costs. Current initiatives include:

  1. Limiting use of consultants and contractors;
  2. Limiting travel (when this resumes) by maintaining alternatives modes of collaboration;
  3. Investing in Greenhouse Gas emission reductions;
  4. Improved procurement of goods and services
  5. Reducing non-salary costs such as printing and associated costs through moving to follow me printing and use of online documentation;
  6. Negotiating better rates for airline and travel (when business travel recommences); and
  7. Flexible working arrangements leading to reduced space footprint.

If you have ideas or suggestions about how we could reduce our non-salary expenses, please share your ideas in this consultation process.

Feedback may be submitted at anu.edu.au/recovery or anurecovery@anu.edu.au.

9.  The University has a high leave liability. If staff take leave, will this help the 2021 budget?

Whilst a reduced leave liability is good for the University's overall financial health, leave is still paid for out of the University's cash balances and does not result in ongoing salary savings.

Staff are encouraged to continue to take regular breaks from work and use their annual and long service leave to take a break and recharge.  Rest and recuperation from work is essential for us all.

10.  Where is revenue generation in this recovery plan?

Under our financial plan the University needs to invest in areas and activities that are strategic priorities.  These include supporting business development and commercialisation of research, philanthropy and fund raising, new modes of teaching such as micro-credentials and ensuring we continue to attract high quality students from across Australia and across the world by offering innovative delivery modes.

11.  How are the budget allocations for 2021 being made?  *Updated 28 September, 9.45am

Throughout the month of August, the Senior Management Group (SMG) and the Vice-Chancellor met to assess the expected reduction in revenue and the overall impact that this will have on the University. The SMG made a recommendation to Council that ongoing expenditure will need to reduce by $103.5 million per annum from 2021 to achieve sustainable levels of expenditure against the projected revenues.  

Discussions were held with Deans and Heads of Portfolio about the strategic intent of areas to arrive at an overall budget allocation for each College and Portfolio for 2021 with an indicative forecast for 2022 and 2023.  This discussion included each College's critical mass, alignment to strategic intent and national priorities, current research and teaching performance, engagement and impact and recent staffing growth. It also included discussion about the input of each portfolio area and the bench-marking of professional services across the sector. These details are still being worked through in each College and Portfolio and further information will be available during the week commencing 5 October, after the consultation on the overall ANU Recovery Plan has been considered.

12.  Who makes the ultimate decision about budget at the Research School/Division level? Will the Director make the decision, or does the Dean/Portfolio Head make this decision?

Deans and Heads of Portfolios will work with Directors to arrive at the allocation for each School or Service Division. How that allocation is utilised within the School or Division must align with the agreed strategic direction of the College or Portfolio and the University. 

13.  Will the University Executive and Deans take a pay-cut after 2020?  *Updated 28 September, 9.45am

The University Executive and Deans took a pay cut in 2020 which provided total salary savings in 2020 of $397,000. 

There have also been many members of the University Leadership Group who have made generous contributions via taking a salary cut (Research School Directors) or making donations to the ANU Staff Urgent Relief Fund

The Vice-Chancellor has agreed with the Chancellor that he will take a pay cut again in 2021. 

14.  Will some areas of the university receive funding to expand, despite the budgetary issues facing us? (i.e. Advancement, RRU)

ANU is an ecosystem, where not every part of ANU can or should make a surplus - but right now, to be sustainable, we need to focus on where we earn our revenue. The parts of the University that earn us our money will need support to keep doing that, and hopefully to find new revenue. This in turn will help all parts of our ecosystem recover and grow.

The University must work to diversify funding sources and collaborations.  It needs to invest to generate revenue and reconsider spending in other areas.  This means slowing but maintaining momentum for some projects, pausing projects where we can pick them back up later, and sadly ceasing some activities entirely.

Each College and Portfolio will be given an allocation in 2021 that reflects its individual circumstances. One of the most important considerations is how we raise new revenue, and how we protect our major revenue streams.

An important part of the financial plan is the investment that needs to be made in areas and activities that are strategic priorities.  These include:

  1. Business development and commercialisation of research
  2. Philanthropy and fund raising
  3. New modes of teaching such as micro-credentials
  4. Continued improvements to the student experience
  5. The creation of a new First Nations portfolio
  6. Excellence and emerging academic areas.

15.  The University closing cash and available cash reserves at the end of July was over $885m. Why aren't we using that?

ANU has substantial financial assets on our balance sheet comprising of cash with commercial banks and investments in the Long-Term Investment Pool (LTIP). At the end of July, our available cash balance was approximately $600 million (which includes $200m of debt to be utilised for capital expenditure and voluntary separations as well as $27m in net insurance proceeds to be used for remediation works and library replacements required due to the flood). In addition to this, we have $285m in the LTIP which is available at University discretion and can be liquidated by selling units in the LTIP.

The LTIP also includes restricted funds totalling $935m which includes endowments, Commonwealth Super Scheme, self-insurance for workers Compensation and Property. These restricted funds are akin to 'trust' accounts and can only be spent for the designated purposes.

The Financial Health Strategy has factored in the available cash balances and reserves.

Reduction in staff numbers

16.  Why does the ANU need to reduce the number of staff?

From 2021, the ANU needs to achieve an ongoing reduction in expenditure each year of $103.5 million. While we are committed to achieving as much of the required savings as possible from non-salary costs, these savings will not be sufficient to close the structural deficit.   

So far, 230 staff have agreed to voluntary separations. Despite the significant contributions made by colleagues who have accepted a voluntary separation, there is a need for a further reduction of 215 positions. This reduction will be achieved through additional voluntary separations, or as a last resort, redundancies.  Once expected recruitment is taken into account, the net reduction in the staffing profile will be 325.  This will achieve 50% of the savings required, with the remaining savings coming from non-salary costs.

17.  What about the pay rise deferral - wasn't this supposed to save jobs?

The deferral of the pay rise in 2020 and 2021 provided a saving of $13.5 million and saved up to 90 positions at ANU. This has made a significant contribution to reducing expenditure.

18.  Why can't you tell me if I will lose my job?

The Vice-Chancellor and the University Senior Management Group are committed to genuinely consulting with the University community on the ANU Recovery Plan. 

It is appreciated that uncertainty can be very difficult however the importance of genuine consultation and seeking input from the Community on the overall need for change before any changes are confirmed cannot be understated.

It is important for our whole community to have the opportunity to assess and consider our circumstances and provide feedback on expenditure reduction next year.

The uncertainty while we go through consultation can be difficult. If you need support during this time, please remember staff and their family members can access free support and counselling through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which can be reached on 1800 808 374 (this number operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week).

Staff can also contact the ANU Advisers to Staff  who provide free, confidential and professional counselling and advice to staff on-campus in dealing with work-related or personal issues that may be affecting their work.  

A full list of our support services is available here.

19.  Will continuing staff be considered for redundancies as part of the savings measures?

Salary savings need to be achieved across the University.  How these savings are achieved will depend on the savings required and the strategic needs in each College and Portfolio. If a reduction in continuing staff positions in a College or Portfolio is required, the University will undertake consultation with directly affected staff and unions on any proposed changes, in accordance with the Job Security and Organisational Change provisions (clauses 67 and 68) in the Enterprise Agreement

20.  Will all areas of the University make staff redundant?

Salary savings need to be achieved across the University.  How this is achieved will depend on the savings required and the strategic needs in each College and Portfolio. These savings may require a reduction in the number of positions in some areas but not in others where savings may be able to be achieved in other ways.

21.  Will the University Executive be reduced in size?

The Vice-Chancellor is aware of the need to seek savings in every part of the University including its leadership team. This is why the VC and the Senior Management Group accepted a pay cut in the second half of 2020. The VC will review the size and structure of the ANU Executive and keep the University informed about any measures to reduce costs among the University's leadership team.

22.  A number of senior staff have support teams - can we reduce the administrative support for these roles?

Each College and Portfolio will identify where changes need to be made to achieve savings and meet the requirements of their 2021 budget allocation. The Deans and Portfolio Heads will work with their School and Research School Directors and Executive and Professional Staff Leaders to identify the nature of the changes which may be required.

This will include consideration of the staffing and support structures that fits within their budget allocation and ensures delivery of their strategic priorities.  This may include a review of service delivery models for professional staff across the University and include resource allocations and/or a reduction and rebalancing of the professional staff workforce.

23.  Will staff reductions impact academic staff?

We will need to reduce our staffing profile by a further 215 positions across the University.  It is expected this will include a reduction in both academic and professional staff positions. We aim to achieve as much of the salary savings through voluntary separations with redundancies being the last resort.

24.  Will more professional or academic staff be made redundant? 

We will need to reduce our staffing profile by a further 215 positions and it is expected this will include a reduction in both academic and professional staff positions. We aim to achieve as much of the salary savings through voluntary separations with redundancies being the last resort.

25.  Will we hire casual and sessional academic staff in 2021?

Yes. There are some areas that will continue to need sessional staff to deliver teaching. We are currently working with the NTEU on developing a pilot program to provide improved job security to casuals in 2021 and beyond.

26.  Will fixed term contracts be terminated early?

This will continue to be managed on a case by case within each College and Portfolios, but it is unlikely that fixed term contracts will be ceased early. If there is a change to operational requirements which impacts the work being undertaken under the fixed term contract, or there are changes to external funding supporting a role, this may result in changes to the contract arrangements. If there are any changes required to fixed term contracts, we will work closely with the staff member and in accordance with the University Enterprise Agreement.

27.  Will fixed term contracts be extended?

This will continue to be managed on a case by case within each College and Portfolio. This means that some fixed term contracts may need to be extended to meet operational requirements and/or support delivery against externally funded projects. Others will cease as planned.If you need more detail or wish to discuss your individual circumstances, please speak to your manager.

28.  Instead of making people redundant, why can't we implement job share arrangements or reduced working hours?

Flexible working arrangements are already in place across the University and arrangements like job sharing or reduced hours are currently available and can be implemented by agreement between staff members and supervisors. These arrangements may be suitable in some areas; however, it will not be suitable for all staff, positions or across all areas of the University. It is also, unfortunately, unlikely these measures would be sufficient to enable the University to achieve the reduction in salary costs that are required in 2021 and beyond.

29.  Will ANU offer an early retirement scheme?

ANU is not offering an early retirement scheme but we will continue to work with staff who may be seeking a departure from the University via a voluntary separation. If you would like to discuss a voluntary separation, and wish to understand the options available, please speak to your General Manager, Service Division Director, Research School Director or School Manager.

30.  How many staff have taken voluntary separations?

So far, 230 staff have agreed to a voluntary separation. We are continuing to discuss options with staff and we expect a further 20 staff may accept voluntary separation.

31.  I have not been approached about a voluntary separation, but I am interested, who do I speak to?

If you are interested in a voluntary separation, please speak to your manager. You can also speak with your General Manager, Service Division Director, Research School Director or School Manager.

32.  If redundancies do occur in my area, what protections are in place?

The University is committed to providing job security and any staff reductions will be managed and achieved through:

  • natural attrition;
  • permanent transfer;
  • redeployment;
  • voluntary conversion to part-time work;
  • Fixed term and pre-retirement agreements; or
  • Voluntary separation.

More information on the Job Security provisions within the ANU Enterprise Agreement can be found here https://services.anu.edu.au/human-resources/enterprise-agreement/67-job-security.

The University will seek wherever possible to avoid redundancies however, where needed, they will be subject to the University's redundancy provisions.   More information about the Redundancy Provisions can be found here https://services.anu.edu.au/human-resources/enterprise-agreement/56-redundancy.

Consultation

33.  Will the change consultation result in academic colleges, research schools or service divisions being merged?

In considering the response that may be needed across Colleges and Portfolios to meet budget allocations and savings targets, the size of Colleges, Research Schools, Portfolios and Service Divisions may change. This may include a review of service delivery models for professional staff across the University, changes in academic organisational units and programs, a change to resource allocations and/or a reduction and rebalancing of both academic and professional staff workforce.

34.  When will the individual College/Portfolio plans be released?

College and Portfolio plans will be released following the consultation on the ANU Recovery Plan.  This is expected to be during the week commencing 5 October.

35.  When will the change consultation in my area commence? When will it be completed?

We are currently consulting with you about the University Recovery Plan which outlines the changes needed across the University to support our recovery.  Proposed changes for individual College or Portfolios will be finalised when we have considered all feedback - Consultation on the ANU Recovery Plan closes on 29 September.

36.  How can I provide feedback on the ANU Recovery Plan??

Feedback may be submitted at anu.edu.au/recovery or anurecovery@anu.edu.au.

37.  When are the consultation dates?

Date

Details of Consultation Process

15 September 2020

Special University Council meeting for approval of University Recovery Plan and Financial Health Strategy

15 September 2020

Briefing with NTEU

16 September 2020

Release Change Proposal to University Community

Consultation period commences

16-29 September 2020

VC Town Hall

College, Portfolio and Student forums

Email feedback

Continued consultation with the NTEU

29 September 2020

Consultation Closes

29 September to 5 October 2020

Review of consultation feedback

Commencing 6 October 2020

Release of commentary on feedback from consultation

Release of College and Portfolio level programs for managing change

University Enrollments, Operations and Activities

38.  How will my area deliver our work (and KPIs) if we reduce our staffing profile?

As part of the ANU Recovery Plan, consideration will be given to research and teaching commitments, and service delivery models across the University. This will involve input and engagement across all Colleges and Portfolios.  In addition to this, Deans, Directors, General Managers, Portfolio Heads and School Managers will work with their teams to adjust to and support any new operational arrangements to ensure that we meet our obligations. This will include identification and communication of priorities to enable continued delivery of commitments and activities across the ANU. 

39.  Will any domestic travel be able to resume in 2021, or has our travel budget been removed?

The University will continue to review the travel arrangements as changes to domestic and international border and travel restrictions are announced.  While it is expected some travel on University business may recommence in 2021, the University is looking to reduce travel in future years as this will significantly reduce our carbon footprint. Staff will be encouraged to only travel where and when necessary; and utilise online platforms such as Zoom for meetings.

40.  Are domestic enrolments capped or can we enrol more students to increase revenue?

We are currently planning to enrol above cap for domestic undergraduate students. However, these places are provided at a lower level of revenue per student and, in some cases (especially in practical intensive disciplines), may incur more cost than the additional revenue they bring in.

Staff entitlements and support

41.  Will academic promotions continue with the current budgetary environment?

The 2020 Academic Promotions round is currently in progress. Promotion applications closed at the end of August and are currently being reviewed and considered by Local Area Promotion Committees and the University Promotions Committee.

42.  Will I still receive my salary increment?

The ANU Recovery Plan does not propose any change to staff entitlements. This includes the incremental progression though the salary structure as provided within the ANU Enterprise Agreement.  

43.  Will professional development budgets be available in 2021 to train and up-skill our staff?

The ANU is committed to a culture of continuous learning and development and in the past two years, on average, we have invested on average $2.5m in professional development. This commitment remains unchanged. It is expected we will need to continue to look at different platforms and options for learning and development as we respond and adjust to the COVID restrictions. In 2020 this has included providing additional online learning for free to ANU staff through LinkedIn Learning which allows staff to undertake micro-learning using their computer, phone or other mobile device to meet their professional and personal development needs.

44.  Will existing entitlements, like the University's paid parental leave for partners, still be available?

The ANU Recovery Plan does not propose any changes to staff entitlements and this includes the current leave policy which includes paid parental leave for partners.

45.  Will the university provide additional support services?

The University's highest priority is the health, wellbeing and safety of our community. We aim to provide our community with support so we can help each other get through this challenging time.

Staff and their family members can access free support and counselling through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which can be reached on 1800 808 374 (this number operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week).

Staff can also contact the ANU Advisers to Staff who provide free, confidential and professional counselling and advice to staff on-campus in dealing with work-related or personal issues that may be affecting their work.  

A full list of our support services is available here.

46.  I need support - who can I talk to?

Our Advisers to Staff and Employee Assistance Program offer support for dealing with uncertainty. They can help provide you with advice about the things that you can do to help support you during times of change.

Name

Position

Contact details

Gail Frank

Dr Maaria Haque

 

 

Adviser to Staff

Adviser to Staff

 

(02) 6125 3616

(02) 6125 8283

staff.adviser@anu.edu.au

Employee Assistance Providers

 

Assure

Relationships Australia

1800 808 374

(02) 6122 7100

Updated FAQs

47.  When will the ANU 2019 Annual Report be published? *Updated 4.40pm 13 October

The 2019 Annual Report has been tabled in Parliament. You can review a copy here: https://www.anu.edu.au/about/strategic-planning/annual-report-2019.

In addition, key financial items have been extracted from the 2019 Annual Report and are now available on the ANU Recovery website: https://www.anu.edu.au/files/guidance/NTEU%20Information%20Request.pdf  

48.  When will you release detailed financial information including details on student enrolments, the ANU Financial Health Strategy and information on budgeted expenditure for strategic investments? 

We've prepared some detailed financial information including: 

  • 2019 and 2020 student enrolment numbers (and dollar value), by semester, broken down into domestic and international; 
  • Modelling on the projected student numbers (and dollar figures) for 2021-2023; 
  • Details from 2019 Annual Report; 
  • The University's Financial Health Strategy; 
  • Current (year to date) and budgeted expenditure for the next three financial years on external consultants; 
  • Budgeted expenditure for the next three financial years on the ANU strategic initiatives Innovation centres (https://www.anu.edu.au/strategic-initiatives); and 
  • Original ANU budget for 2020 and revised budget following the commencement of the pandemic. 

This is now available on the ANU Recovery website: https://www.anu.edu.au/files/guidance/NTEU%20Information%20Request_0.pdf.

49.  Why doesn't ANU wait for the release of the Federal Budget before starting this consultation? What happens if we receive additional funding?  

We have been in discussions with the Government during the COVID-19 pandemic to discuss the impact on our institution. We have already considered the impact of the Job Ready Graduates Package in our modelling and will continue to advocate actively for more support for universities. This includes advocating for a research package to allow us to continue to conduct research that transforms society and creates sovereign capability. 

The Federal Budget will be  released at 7.30pm on Tuesday 6 October. We are not aware of any significant announcements that would change the Financial Health Strategy. However should anything be announced as part of the Budget which will materially affect our  projections, we will take these into consideration.

50.  Is a further payrise deferral or a paycut possible? 

The ANU Recovery Plan does not propose any change to staff entitlements.  We are keen to hear your feedback on this. 

Any change to entitlements, including further deferral of a ANU Enterprise Agreement payrise or a cut to salaries, would require consultation with all staff and staff vote. 

51.  What happened to the pilot plan that was proposed to support the early return of International Students?  Will that be proceeding and how are you supporting impacted students in the meantime? 

The proposed pilot for the return of international students has not been approved by the Commonwealth Government at this stage.  We are continuing to prioritise support for students who are impacted by the events of 2020.  A full listing of support and information available to students is available: https://www.anu.edu.au/covid-19-advice/health-wellbeing/support-services#Students.

52.  Will my HDR scholarship be impacted by the ANU Recovery Plan? * Updated 19 October (2.45pm)

All current HDR scholarships will be paid and the conditions of award will not change as a result of the ANU Recovery Plan. For University Research Scholarships (URS) and Research Training Program (RTP) scholarship holders, your automatic extension has been applied and will be paid.  

If you have been impacted by COVID-19, please visit the HDR candidate support page for information on: 

  • Extensions to Candidature; 

  • Scholarships; 

  • Offshore Commencement;  

  • COVID-19 impacts to your research; and  

  • Fieldwork.  

Additional FAQs on HDR scholarships are provided in FAQ 2.27 to FAQ 2.29. 

53.  Why is the University still charging the full Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF) even though classes are being delivered both on-campus and remotely for semester 2? 

Student Services, including Academic Skills, Access and Inclusion and ANU Careers are all offering Flexible options to ensure students can continue to get access to these services even if they are unable to make it to campus. More information can be found here: https://www.anu.edu.au/covid-19-advice/latest-updates/grading-exams-and-assessment-in-semester-2-2020/academic-support 

We are offering a range of scholarships and targeted financial assistance to students who have been impacted by COVID and need support. Full details of the financial support on offer can be found here: https://www.anu.edu.au/covid-19-advice/student-life/financial-assistance  

54.  Why is the University still charging full fees even though classes are being delivered both on-campus and remotely for semester 2? 

We are offering a range of scholarships and targeted financial assistance to those students who have been impacted by COVID and need support. Full details of the financial support on offer can be found here: https://www.anu.edu.au/covid-19-advice/student-life/financial-assistance 

55.  When will we know if classes will be delivered on campus or remotely in 2021? When will we return to face to face learning for those who can make it to the campus? 

We commenced a combination of on-campus and remote teaching from Semester 2 following advice of our medical experts. The safety and wellbeing of our community remains our highest priority.  

We will continue to review and increase our on-campus teaching as and when possible. 

Students will be able to enrol in Semester 1, 2021 classes from 4 December.  

56.  Will availability of my courses be impacted by the ANU Recovery Plan? When will the semester 1, 2021 courses be released? 

Colleges are currently working through finalising the courses available for 2021. Ensuring a wide selection of course choices as well as availability of all compulsory courses remains central to this process.

Students will be able to enrol on ISIS in their Semester 1, 2021 courses from Friday 4 December, 2020.

57.  Will casual tutoring positions be available in 2021? 

Yes. Our casual and fixed-term colleagues provide an important contribution to the world-class teaching, research and professional expertise on our campus.

There are some areas that will continue to need sessional staff to deliver teaching. We are currently working with the NTEU on developing a pilot program to provide improved job security to casuals in 2021 and beyond.

58.  How much have student numbers been impacted by COVID? 

Student numbers have reduced due to a combination of the effects of COVID 19 and our strategy to keep ANU a human-scale community so that we can deliver a student experience that is as good as the best in the world.

Information on student numbers for 2019 and 2020 is available on our website: https://www.anu.edu.au/files/guidance/NTEU%20Information%20Request_0.pdf.

59.  Support for students 

We provide a range of support services to domestic and international students, to support their wellbeing, learning and development. This includes a 24/7 Wellbeing and Support Line, ANU Counselling Centre (support for mental health), Respectful Relationships Unit (support for sexual assault and harassment) and the National Health Coop (services for physical and mental health).

A list of support services for students can be found here: https://www.anu.edu.au/covid-19-advice/health-wellbeing/support-services.

We have also established the Shanghai Study Hub, to support our China-based students as they commence or continue remote learning throughout Semester 2, 2020. More information is available here: https://www.anu.edu.au/covid-19-advice/student-life/anu-shanghai-study-hub.

60.  What is the difference between a voluntary separation and a redundancy? 

A voluntary separation is a negotiated departure from ANU, mutually agreed between the University and the departing staff member, negotiating the date of departure and the terms and conditions of departure. Under the current voluntary separation arrangements, we are matching the redundancy provisions under the ANU Enterprise Agreement.

On the other hand, a redundancy is one of the potential outcomes resulting from a change management process. Under a change management plan the university may propose the dis-establishment of a position. Following consultation, the university is required as part of the ANU Enterprise Agreement to work through job security options, and if unable to action any of those options, it may be necessary to disestablish the position. If this occurs, the redundancy provisions will be implemented. The redundancy provisions are found in Clause 56 of the ANU Enterprise Agreement and require the university to consider redeployment options. If a staff member is unable to be redeployed, then notice will be provided and a redundancy payment will be made.

61.  Student Modelling - Growth Assumptions 

Our strategy is to keep ANU a human-scale academic community so that we can deliver a student experience that is as good as the best in the world.

In line with this strategy we had already begun to reduce student numbers from our highs in 2018 down towards our endorsed target, however COVID has resulted in a much higher reduction than planned, well below that target.

Throughout 2020 our student community has remained engaged and committed to their studies, despite the challenging circumstances, and we expect our students to continue to do so and this is reflected in our current assumptions.

We have seen strong demand from new domestic students for commencement in 2021 and as a result the University expects domestic student numbers to recover to 2019 levels by 2022.

International commencing student numbers have been more impacted by COVID.

Our current modelling assumes borders will be open in time for our semester two intake in 2021 and we will see a slow recovery in student numbers across 2021 - 2023, but it is not until beyond 2023 that we expect to see numbers return to our pre-COVID levels.

Information on the student load for 2019 and 2020 is available on the recovery website: https://www.anu.edu.au/files/guidance/NTEU%20Information%20Request_0.pdf.

For those students looking to start their studies at ANU, but who cannot yet join us in person, there is a range of information on available support services, offshore commencement and on our pilot program on our COVID site and we look forward to you joining us on campus as soon as possible.

62.  Will staff purchase cards be re-instated for 2021? 

Each College Dean and Portfolio Head will decide on the allocation of purchase cards within the agreed University parameters.  The only central restriction on purchase cards related in 2020 to those areas unable to meet the expenditure control targets. 

63.  Why are academic promotions going ahead? 

Academic promotions are an important recognition for our staff to recognise the level at which academic staff are performing and to ensure that we pay them at the appropriate level. This is to ensure that we continue to pursue our academic mission, reward excellence and performance against our academic mission, and remain competitive with benchmarks.  We also need to ensure that we balance this against potential salary savings. Any salary savings from not running academic promotions in 2020 would have been negligible and mean that we wouldn't be paying our staff at the level at which they are working.  

64.  I couldn't attend one of the Forums. Can I listen to a recording or see a copy of the presentation?

Yes. A copy of the recordings is available here and you can view a copy of the Chief Operating Officer's slide deck here.

65.  I don't feel comfortable speaking to my supervisor about a voluntary separation. Is there another contact for a confidential conversation?

Staff who are not comfortable talking with their direct supervisor may approach their Dean/Director or Portfolio head or contact the HR Division directly. Any negotiations about a voluntary separation will need to be approved by the relevant College or Portfolio Head to ensure that teaching and research, and relevant support, is able to continue.

67.  How many staff have accepted a voluntary separation?

As of Tuesday 22 September:

  • 252 staff have indicated they will accept a voluntary separation package. Of these, 143 staff have already departed.
  • The breakdown between academic and professional staff is approximately 30:70, and this includes the Academic Colleges and Service Portfolios. The gender split is approximately 50:50 (48.4% female: 51.6% male).

68.  Other universities in the sector have seen lower job reductions than ANU is planning. Why is ANU needing to make a larger reduction than our sector counterparts?

Each University's circumstances and financial positions are different, so it is difficult to compare different University's responses. However, we are constantly monitoring what information is made public and considering if any of these ideas would be sensible options for ANU given our own circumstances. If, through your contacts, you became aware of strategies or ideas being considered at other University's that you think ANU should consider we would value you submitting them through the feedback mechanisms (e.g. staff forums or email: anurecovery@anu.edu.au).

69.  Will staff on secondment be required to return to their substantive positions? And/or is there a process to arrange permanent transfers into seconded positions when there is no permanent staff member for these positions?

Staff will be expected to return to their substantive position at the conclusion of their secondment. If the position that a staff member is seconded to becomes vacant, the local area will need to work through the standard recruitment processes if they wish to fill the position on an ongoing basis.

70.  I approached my supervisor about a voluntary separation and was told my position is essential and I cannot take a voluntary separation. Can you please explain this?

Some positions are considered essential or critical to our operations and local areas. It is not suitable or financially prudent for the University to offer voluntary separations to the staff members in these positions. If we did so, it would then mean that we would need to recruit to fill the position to ensure the operational requirements to the university. Overall, this wouldn't contribute to reducing staffing numbers and would be a net cost to the university rather than contributing to overall salary savings.

71.  If I agree to change my role to part time, is there a guarantee that I can return to full time after an agreed amount of time or when the financial position of ANU improves?

Any staff member who wishes to consider a reduction to part-time work hours can discuss this with their supervisor and put this in place either permanently or for an agreed period.

72.  Will the Vice-Chancellor's end of year Garden Party be held in December 2020?  

No. The Vice-Chancellor's Garden party will not be held in 2020 due to the COVID-19 restrictions on large gatherings. 

In lieu of the Garden Party, the Vice-Chancellor has granted an additional ex-gratia day of leave to all staff on 24 December.  

The end of year shut-down period will be from 24 December 2020 until 3 January 2021. We encourage staff to take a break over the period to rest, reset and recharge.  

73.  How is equity and diversity being considered as part of the ANU Recovery Plan?  

A commitment to ANU remaining an inclusive, diverse and equitable community is a top priority, and one of our core institutional values. Where there are possible impacts on equity and diversity from proposed changes in local areas, the ANU Executive and College Deans are working together to consider and analyse the possible outcomes.