Sam Provost

It is vital that we build our knowledge of traditional Aboriginal agriculture and land management practices so we can integrate them into our interactions with the ecosystems we depend on.

"For people who have come from all over Australia to study at ANU, Tjabal is a family and a place to get together and yarn like we would at home. Culture can get lost in a big institution like this, the Tjabal Centre affirms the range of Indigenous cultures at the university and provides a safe space for us to celebrate them.

"For me, connection to country, to Australian landscapes, and my Aboriginal culture are inseparable. Studying environmental science and Indigenous Australian studies has allowed me to deepen my understanding of these connections.

"Australia is an old, dry continent and a quick look at the current state of our ecosystems shows that land management practices developed in Europe aren't appropriate for our landscape. It is vital that we build our knowledge of traditional Aboriginal agriculture and land management practices and integrate them into our interactions with the ecosystems we depend on.

 "As well as studying at ANU, I'm a cadet at Geoscience Australia. Working there has given me the opportunity to develop my geospatial analysis skills and understand the broad applications of GIS, as well as its potential to help Indigenous communities articulate culturally specific ways of understanding spaces.

"What I want in particular is to help to conserve the culture of communities in Yuin country on the South Coast of NSW, which is my country. I am about to begin my honours looking at how we can develop culturally appropriate maps that represent and conserve Indigenous values. I would not have been able work in this space that means so much to me without the support of Anne and the staff at Tjabal."