Pristine graphene

Researchers from ANU have developed a technique of graphene extraction that represents an improvement on currently known methods in terms of yield, quality, cost and environmental benefits. The novelty of the method lies in the use of ultrasonic separation of graphite in water, assisted by a precisely selected and rate-controlled addition of a surfactant.

Background

Graphene's unique properties lend itself for use in a myriad of industries such as the electronics, automotive, communications, aerospace and solar industries. The starting material, graphite (consisting of a stack of many flat graphene sheets) is inexpensive and easily available. However, the main barrier to widespread industry uptake is the lack of a high-yield and high-throughput processing method to produce affordable graphene at an industrial scale.

Opportunity

Dr Shannon Notley from ANU has developed a technique of graphene extraction that represents an improvement on currently known methods in terms of yield, quality, cost and environmental benefits.