Emily Rose Rees: Tackling big issues of the future

5 January 2018

I hope to apply my engineering degree towards tackling some of the big issues of the future, particularly in creating sustainable solutions for growing cities and populations.

The 2017 Natasha Linard Scholarship recipient, Emily Rose Rees, chose to come to ANU as it was the only University that allowed her to do an undergraduate engineering degree and conduct her own research projects at the same time.

"The engineering at ANU is systems engineering, which is a whole-of-system approach and allows me to work across multi-disciplinary projects and learn the skills required to address the complex issues of today and tomorrow."

Emily Rose is hopeful that she can make a difference to the world with her degree.

"I hope to apply my engineering degree towards tackling some of the big issues of the future, particularly in creating sustainable solutions for growing cities and populations."

Receiving the Natasha Linard Scholarship has furthered Emily Rose's awareness of the important work that has gone into trying to achieve gender equity in STEM. She hopes that the scholarship "encourages other women to continue mentoring and supporting each other."

"Throughout this year I will be working with the University to help ensure the scholarship is self-sustaining, and that future women engineers will also be able to benefit from this scholarship."

Emily Rose has also enjoyed meeting Natasha's family and friends. "We had a lovely conversation about Natasha and her legacy, and how we could continue to honour her memory through this scholarship."

The Natasha Linard Scholarship was established in memory of Dr Natasha Linard, an outstanding and inspiring role model for female engineers. She was one of the first female ANU students to graduate with a Bachelor of Engineering and a PhD in Engineering.

The scholarship supports female students in the final year of the undergraduate program at the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science to build their leadership skills and develop a mentoring relationship with prominent professionals. The scholarship is one of the many steps taken by the ANU to increase the proportionally low number of female students represented in engineering and technology degree programs across the board in Australia.

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