THIS LECTURE IS POSTPONED DUE TO FLOODING: 10th Jack Westoby Lecture: Whose woods are these? Rising to the challenge of managing the global forest estate

Presented by ANU College of Science
THIS LECTURE IS POSTPONED DUE TO FLOODING

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Jack Westoby, in The Purpose of Forests: Follies of Development, stated: "Forestry is not about trees, it is about people. And it is about trees only insofar as trees can serve the needs of people." This quote resonates widely across the world and has motivated many people to pursue forestry as a means to support and sustain human welfare. This is a noble goal. But, while focusing on how forests contribute to human needs, do we risk neglecting the health and wellbeing of forests? Who is watching out for the needs of 80% of the world's terrestrial species that live in forests? Is this the role of the forestry sector? What is the role of the forestry sector in forest landscape restoration? Can we solve pressing global problems based on sectorial management approaches? Or has the time come to deconstruct existing sectorial policies focused on forestry, agriculture, mining, water, and environment and reconstruct our institutions, government ministries, and knowledge bases to effectively manage the global forest estate for the benefit of people and the planet? I will discuss these questions and present a case for the need to develop and adopt cross-sectorial approaches to forest management, conservation, and restoration built on realities of coupled human and natural systems.  

Professor Robin Chazdon is Professor Emerita in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of Connecticut and Research Professor with the Tropical Forests and People Centre at the University of the Sunshine Coast; and a Senior Fellow with the World Resources Institute Global Restoration Initiative, where she is working to enhance decision support tools for landscape restoration and promote natural regeneration in restoration planning. Her long-term and on-going collaborative research focuses on successional pathways, forest dynamics, drivers of land-use change, and functional ecology of trees in Neotropical forests.