ANU Giving Day to help prevent crippling disease

16 September 2016

Konzo is a neurological disease that causes irreversible paralysis of the legs, often in children and young women. It's caused by malnutrition and consumption of high levels of a cyanide compound found in cassava - a common staple food in tropical Africa.

Konzo can't be cured, but it can be prevented by educating those who prepare cassava - mainly women.

Thanks to the dedicated research of Dr Howard Bradbury, there's now a simple and inexpensive method that removes the poisonous cyanide compound from cassava flour.

ANU is now working with local health authorities in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to raise awareness of this method, and educate affected communities.

This work has already prevented konzo in 16 villages across the region.

Wednesday 21 September is ANU Giving Day. By making a gift you will directly support educational programs that teach women how to remove the cyanide compound from their food and prevent new outbreaks of konzo.

You can also show your support and raise awareness by signing up to the social media campaign.

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